Friday, July 21, 2006

Suffolk University offering two-credit course for VOICES RISING

Any participating teachers interested in obtaining two graduate credits at a reduced rate for their involvement with this project should contact their Teacher Learning Center director as soon as possible.


HST 581. Assimilation and the American Experience.

An in-depth examination of American history from the founding to the Civil War. Participants will read first-person accounts and analyze historical documents, visit historical sites, and historical repositories. Each student will prepare curriculum plan focused on one historical site or set of documents, to teach American history with documents, paintings, and artifacts. Topics to be covered include: the founding of American colonies; the development of the Atlantic slave trade; beginnings of the American Revolution; slavery and slave resistance in 19th-century America; Benjamin Franklin and the creation of American character.

In Part 2, participants will narrow their focus to particular topics in American history, and will receive training in using historical repositories. Topics to be covered will include colonial captivity narratives, women’s lives and labor in colonial America, using the National Archives and doing local research, maritime life in the early American republic, and the coming of the Civil War.

Designed as a graduate course for 3rd, 5th, and 8th grade teachers, and school librarians.

Readings:

Gary Nash, Red, White, and Black.
Benjamin Franklin, The Autobiography.
Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of Olaudah Equiano.
Selected federalist and anti-federalist writings.
Kenneth S. Greenberg, editor, The Confessions of Nat Turner.
Kenneth S. Greenberg, editor, Nat Turner: A Slave Rebellion in History and Memory.


Participating Scholars:

Robert Allison, Suffolk University
Kenneth S. Greenberg, Suffolk University
Robert Bellinger, Suffolk University
John Cavanagh, Suffolk University
Patricia Reeve, Suffolk University
Louis P. Masur, Trinity College
Ted Widmer, John Carter Brown Library